Citizen Scholars Program Enhances Student’s College Experience


Meet Triniti Watson, a junior Interdisciplinary Humanities major with a focus on Philosophy, Professional Writing, and Cultural Anthropology. Watson is also an active participant in the Citizen Scholars program, the North Neighborhood Black Caucus, the University's Academic Orientation Program, and the LGBT Resource Center. We caught up with her on her experience with MSU and the College of Arts & Letters. 

Why did you choose to come to MSU?
I came to MSU because the community on campus seemed very welcoming and diligent towards making change in the world. Spartans are critical thinkers who use their knowledge to transform and uplift, and I believed going here would reveal where I stand in such action. 

Why did you join the Citizen Scholars program? 
I joined CS because I was curious as to how it could shape my college experience. It seemed like an opportunity to enhance my awareness of the world around me and provide tools to challenge my previous notions on what it means to be a citizen and serve communities. 

Spartans are critical thinkers who use their knowledge to transform and uplift.

What have you achieved that you may have not been able to without the Citizen Scholars program?
I’ve had numerous opportunities in relation to public speaking for the program, as well as having access to student leaders, events, and conferences. What I appreciate most about these opportunities is that they all derived from the program, making me aware of such events and encouraging my participation. Without such connections, I don’t think I’d be the student leader I am now. 

How has the Citizen Scholar program impacted your education and service learning?
The program has taught me an interdisciplinary approach towards different disciplines and how to apply different concepts to certain situations. Service learning has played an important role in my visualization and engagement with different communities. It’s provided a landscape where I can apply what I’m learning through my immersive education and put such theory into practice.

What would you say your role is with the Citizen Scholars program? 
My role is to promote the program and communicate why it’s a fortunate experience to have during undergrad. It has taught me how to become a better student leader and use my voice and experiences to create meaning and purpose out of things I deem are important. As a Citizen Scholar, I work to uphold what it means to be both a scholar in search of knowledge and a citizen within the numerous communities I belong to. 

The program has reinforced in me that I am a global citizen and have the skills to work with other diverse and inquisitive individuals to embody the change and hope we have for our futures.

What advice do you have for new Citizen Scholars?  
Fully invest in your curiosities and don’t be afraid to build your own path towards goals you have for yourself.  

What advantage does a student gain by studying at MSU’s College of Arts & Letters?
A student can benefit from CAL’s inclusive and thought-provoking curriculum that assures its students are well educated on the human condition and what it looks like amongst different populations. 

What did you do over the summer?
Over the summer, I assisted with CS program outreach during AOP (Academic Orientation Program) and worked at the LBGT Resource Center in the Student Services Building. 

Has your experience with CAL and the CS program influenced what you would like to do with your life outside and beyond MSU? 
The CS program has highly influenced my capacities as a learner and showed me different ways I can assist in changing the world. The program has reinforced in me that I am a global citizen and have the skills to work with other diverse and inquisitive individuals to embody the change and hope we have for our futures. 

What other organizations are you involved with on campus?
The Intercultural Aid Program (ICA)